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Sleeplessness will reduce the size of your brain


Sleeplessness Photo by travelpod.com. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic License.
Latest news disseminated online that recent study published in an online issue of Neurology. This topic is about “lack of sleep affects the size of your brain”.

According to Daily Times, European researchers looked at 147 adults between the ages of 20 and 84. With two MRI scans, they examined the link between sleep problems like insomnia and the study participants’ brain volume. The first scan was taken before patients completed a questionnaire pertaining to their sleep habits. The second scan was done approximately 3 1/2 years later.

The questionnaire showed that 35 percent of those in the study met the criteria for poor sleep health. Investigators found that those with sleep problems had a more rapid decline in brain volume or size over the course of the study than those who slept well.

The results were even more significant in participants over the age of 60.
Numerous studies have showed the importance of sleep and the effect sleep deprivation can have on our brains. It is well-known that poor sleep patterns can contribute to such brain disorders as Alzheimer’s and dementia.

So it stands to reason that, if a lack of sleep can lead to memory loss, the size of the brain would also be affected.

“We know that a lack of sleep can lead to all kinds of problems,” explained Dr Neal Maru, a neurologist and sleep specialist with Integrated Sleep Services in Alexandria, Virginia, who is not associated with the study. “Poor sleep can affect our immune systems, our cardiovascular health, weight and of course, memories. But we still don’t know why. Studies have shown poor sleep can cause protein build-up in the brain that attacks brain cells. So we’re still trying to put the puzzle together.”
The study authors agree.

“It is not yet known whether poor sleep quality is a cause or consequence of changes in brain structure,” said author Claire Sexton of the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom.

“There are effective treatments for sleep problems, so future research needs to test whether improving people’s quality of sleep could slow the rate of brain volume loss. If that is the case, improving people’s sleep habits could be an important way to improve brain health.”


Source : Daily Times

Jonathan D. Orbuda, an Economics graduate and now an occasional motivational speaker, was a writer way back in college, when he served as a section editor (2007-2008) of The Pillar Group of Publications. But beyond this, he established a blogsite detailing traveling sans (much of the) frills. Since finishing his schooling, he already worked for a bank and the BPO industry, among others. But his burning passion remains writing, and so he now travels as much as he can to discover what this world (and life) has to offer. As he keeps stressing: “Live life the most out of it ” You can email him at ilovetansyong(at)gmail(dot)com for any concern , or connect him at Google+

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